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Archive for the ‘Floral’ Category

One thing that I’ve been waffling about is a Sweetheart Table. I can’t decide about it. I’d loved the idea initially, instead of a long head table with mostly vacated seats– let’s face it, the wedding party never sits down, anyway. But, a few months ago, this idea was called into question– a bridal publication (I can’t remember which) pooh-poohed the Sweetheart Table, saying, “Isn’t that what the honeymoon is for?”

I did a bit of research for this post, visiting some major wedding industry publications as consultants. The Knot seems to think that a Sweetheart Table is romantic, but Martha  (my lover) has this to say: “The traditional “sweetheart” table-for-two can make a couple feel isolated and self-conscious.”

So I have to ask: am I doing something wrong?

I’d never seen a Sweetheart Table until fairly recently. I’d thought it was a new, breakaway trend and that I was being a free-thinking, modern bride! Turns out, Martha says it’s traditional! So, what do you think? Are Brandon and I isolating guests by enjoying our meal by ourselves? (I have a tendency to think a Sweetheart Table would improve our chances of actually eating, though I’m not holding out much hope.) Or, are we enjoying a romantic night together, while avoiding the politics of seating? What do you think?

And, before you make a judgment, please see the following inspiration photos for the Sweetheart Table:

sweetheart-table-2

sweetheart-table-1

And I’ll plop my own bouquet right in the center. Just to remind you– it looks like this (clearly, I have a thing for callas):

my-bouquet-for-rizzle

Imagine how absolutely lovely a Sweetheart Table could look! I love the potential decor… but is that a good enough reason? Comment with your opinion!

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Well, you’ve seen the bouquet, you’ve seen the church flowers. Here’s what I’m thinking for our reception. To jog your memory, our beautiful reception venue looks like this:

Photo by Cindy Patrick

Photo by Cindy Patrick

 So, we’re thinking about flowers like these for our reception space. We’re going to alternate high and low arrangements, with more low than high. Theme flowers, like I mentioned before, are going to be white calla lillies, hydrangeas, and white roses. Here’s what’s inspired me:

centerpieces

 

centerpieces-3

centerpieces-2

I really love the vibrant green of the stems. The top two have way more calla lillies than I can probably afford, as they’re pretty expensive. But I thought this was a nice way to incorporate the fresh green of the rest of our decor, and also keep it natural and muted. I love the Thai leaves that are incorporated as well– they add a really nice element of greenery that I’m very attracted to.

For our low arrangements, something like this–

flowers-table-arrangements

hydrangea-love

ivory-and-green

low-centerpieces

I love the hydrangeas– not many blossoms are needed to make a full, lush arrangement! And, again, they’re a nice, muted tone, but still can be a wow when clumped together. There won’t be any callas in the small arrangements, only the large ones.

And, I’m thinking of hatching another DIY project. I cannot imagine that children will appreciate flowers– I just don’t think they will. Perhaps at the kids tables, I’ll use buckets filled with crayons, coloring books and candy as a centerpiece, instead of cluttering the table with them, which I was going to give out anyway. Is that tacky? I’ll make sure they’re toward the interior, instead of a very photo-visible exterior table.

So, what do you think? With an estimate of 22 tables, how many high and how many low?

Do you have signature flowers for your event?

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I’ve been thinking a lot about Church flowers. Initially, I’d wanted fresh flowers on all the pews. Let me refresh your memory of what our church looks like:

sanctuary-2

So… I counted at one point. But I’ve forgotten. All I know is that’s a long-ass aisle, with an exorbitant number of pews. It seats 750! You can hardly blame us, then, when I realized that fresh flowers on all of the pews was definitely pork spending in our budget.

Without shame, I present our solution: silk. Yep, that’s right, silk flowers. I’m going to do it, and it will hopefully is going to look good. My dear cousin also used silk flowers (and I wouldn’t have been able to tell!), and I trust her to-be-wed judgment best of all. I saw this picture on the Knot, and thought, of course I can make that!

potential-for-church-not-too-green1

I probably won’t monogram the cones– I just found out that my Aunt has a ton of them that her daughter used for her wedding– also with silk flowers. Since hydrangeas are a theme flower for the day, I’ll probably use them in my DIY fake arrangements. Also, I’ve seen real hydrangeas that I was positively convinced were fake. They’re a good flower to work with, I think.

I would still like to have some fresh arrangements in the front of the church, however. Perhaps some ferns; we can then pot them in our new apartment (which I must blog about soon!) OR, we can do themed arrangements, like these:

lillies1

However, my mother and I are terrified that they’ll get lost in the huge expanse of the Church. It will be like Where’s Waldo? all over again! It’s just so huge that I’m afraid no one will see them, and we will have wasted our money. We can (and will!) recycle them, incorporating them into the reception somehow– perhaps at the gift table or near the place cards?

Our florist gave us a few very helpful hints when considering church flowers that I thought I’d pass along:

  1. If there’s more than one wedding at the Church per day, call the other brides scheduled to be married and split the difference of the flowers. Go with a simple white, and you can combine costs to use the flowers at the Church all day; then, donate the flowers to the Church. You may have trouble obtaining information about the other couples from your Church, but if they relent, you could easily reduce a $300 arrangement down to $100.
  2. For centerpieces in the front of the Church, consider using triangular bases, such that the Florist will only incorporate the flowers into the facade of the arrangement, like a set in a play. Since they will be facing front, from the altar, and the congregation will get no perspective on the fullness of the flower, you can use 1/3 the number of flowers as a normal arrangement. The downside of this idea is that you will not be able to easily recycle these flowers; the jig is up if the front-heavy arrangement graces the gift table.
  3. Don’t skimp on your bouquet. Get the most elaborate, beautiful and expensive bouquet that you can afford. Your attendants don’t need anything special. Aside from the pictures, their flowers will end up abandoned on a chair or table while they dance the night away. Your flowers, however, are a part of your ensemble. (And, traditional ettiquette dictates the groom’s family pays for the brideal bouquet!)  
  4. Lastly, don’t sink all of your money on church flowers. In the grand scope of the event, with the average wedding reception lasting 5 hours and the average ceremony lasting 1, the church flowers will be visible and appreciated for a mere 1/6 of the event. That’s so little time, and so little money to be wasted. Instead, opt for nicer arrangements at your reception, or more elaborate bouquets that will be appreciated by guests and your attendants thoroughout the event.

Next up: the reception.

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